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 LOVE AS FOLLY by Jean-Honore Fragonard VICTORIAN CHERUB

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16 X 20 GROUPS 16 X 20 GROUPS
8 X 10 Framed Inspirational 8 X 10 Framed Inspirational
8 X 10 FRAMED ART 8 X 10 FRAMED ART
.99 SPECIAL .99 SPECIAL
ABSTRACT ABSTRACT
AFGHANS AFGHANS
AUDUBON BIRDS AUDUBON BIRDS
BEACH SCENES BEACH SCENES
ARTIST ARTIST
ANIMALS ANIMALS
BLACK ART BLACK ART
ANGELS ANGELS
CHILDREN CHILDREN
BUILDINGS BUILDINGS
CONTEMPARY CONTEMPARY
DECO DECO
EUROPEAN SCENES EUROPEAN SCENES
FANTASY FANTASY
HORSES HORSES
FLORAL FLORAL
FOLK ART FOLK ART
FOX HUNT FOX HUNT
FLORIST ITEMS FLORIST ITEMS
FRAMED ART FRAMED ART
GROUPINGS GROUPINGS
HANDCOLORED ART HANDCOLORED ART
HISTORICAL HISTORICAL
HOLIDAYS HOLIDAYS
MPRESSIONISTS MPRESSIONISTS
LANDSCAPE LANDSCAPE
LIMITED EDITIONS LIMITED EDITIONS
MAPS MAPS
MUSICAL MUSICAL
NUDES NUDES
MUSEUM ARTISTS MUSEUM ARTISTS
ORIENTIAL ORIENTIAL
POSTERS POSTERS
RELIGIOUS RELIGIOUS
SHIPS SHIPS
SPORTS SPORTS
STILL LIFE STILL LIFE
THEATER THEATER
TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION
VICTORIAN VICTORIAN
WESTERN WESTERN
WHOLESALE PACKAGES WHOLESALE PACKAGES


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LOVE AS FOLLY by Jean-Honore Fragonard VICTORIAN CHERUB
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Image size of print is 20 X 16 inches. This is an Oval shaped print.

LOVE AS FOLLY by Jean-Honore Fragonard (French 1732-1806) National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

Fragonard, Jean-Honor� (1732-1806). French painter whose scenes of frivolity and gallantry are among the most complete embodiments of the Rococo spirit. He was a pupil of Chardin for a short while and also of Boucher, before winning the Prix de Rome in 1752. From 1756 to 1761 he was in Italy, where he eschewed the work of the approved masters of the High Renaissance, but formed a particular admiration for Tiepolo.


He travelled and drew landscapes with Hubert Robert and responded with especial sensitivity to the gardens of the Villa d'Este at Tivoli, memories of which occur in paintings throughout his career. In 1765 he became a member of the Academy with his historical picture in the Grand Manner Coroesus Sacrificing himself to Save Callirhoe (Louvre, Paris). He soon abandoned this style, however, for the erotic canvases by which he is chiefly known (The Swing, Wallace Collection, London, c. 1766). After his marriage in 1769 he also painted children and family scenes. He stopped exhibiting at the Salon in 1767 and almost all his work was done for private patrons. Among them was Mme du Barry, Louis XV's most beautiful mistress, for whom he painted the works that are often regarded as his masterpieces -- the four canvases representing The Progress of Love (Frick Collection, New York, 1771-73). These, however, were returned by Mme du Barry and it seems that taste was already turning against Fragonard's lighthearted style. He tried unsuccessfully to adapt himself to the new Neoclassical vogue, but in spite of the admiration and support of David